Medicine news

Letter to the Editor: Getting the Truth: Emergency Medicine News

Editor:

What about the sensational stories on the front page of the January issue? While I agree with the spirit that EPs that spread misinformation should lose board certification, who gets to decide? This year’s misinformation could be next year’s standard of care. Should doctors who were against solumedrol for spinal cord injury (heresy 20 years ago) have lost their certification? This article implies that Dr. Simone Gold is an example of someone who could lose her certification, even though she is not currently certified. (REM. 2022;44[1]1: https://bit.ly/3FoT1bw.)

The second article is also misleading. It details the allegedly contrived allegations against Dr. Kristin Carmody that resulted in her seemingly blatant dismissal. The last four paragraphs of this long article explain why she quit (wasn’t actually fired). The article stated that she had seen a patient with a medical student and attested that she had performed a history and physical examination, supposedly the only attestation available on Epic (although the article suggests that she did not had never seen the patient). (REM. 2022;44[1]1: https://bit.ly/3pOFRQw.)

I find it very hard to believe that she couldn’t have typed in her attestation or edited the attestation in Epic. If she hasn’t seen this patient and documented that she has, then she’s committed at least fraud and likely malpractice, plain and simple. When I see a patient with a medical student, I reiterate and expand on the story with the patient and perform my own review. While this event may have given the administration an excuse to get rid of her, in my view, it does not justify the behavior that resulted in her resignation.

These sensational headlines require intensive reading of the articles to find out the truth. Sensationalism has no place in a medical publication.

Tony Magalski, MD

Des Moines, Iowa

Editor’s note: As noted in the original article, Dr. Carmody said Robert J. Femia, MD, chair of emergency medicine at NYU, demanded that she resign, and she did so because she feared for her. his career and his future.