Medicine student

Wake Forest School of Medicine student awaits ‘game day’ results

It’s “game day” at medical schools across the country. An exciting and challenging stage for fourth-year medical students. They will know where they complete their residencies after graduation when the envelopes are opened at noon. Wake Forest School of Medicine student Lauren West-Livingston said she was excited to know where she will be paired up. He is a person who defines resilience, focus and determination and through the ups and downs of life and has let nothing stop him from achieving his dreams. West-Livingston is a daughter, wife, mother and friend. She has two master’s degrees, a doctorate, and is about to add a medical degree to her long and growing list of credentials. “Something that was instilled in me when I was younger was that any opportunity you have to get an education, to have a job or to have a career, there are certain privileges that I I will have that other people won’t have and if I can use my education and my job opportunities to better the lives of others, that’s really what matters at the end of the day,” West-Livingston said. That’s why she was drawn to vascular surgery, which helps treat conditions affecting certain parts of the body like veins and arteries.She found her passion in this specialty at Wake Forest School of Medicine. had the opportunity to work with marginalized patients who maybe hadn’t seen a doctor for many, many years, before showing up to vascular surgeons with a big problem. So I think this was my second year in the general classification, I was a bit like okay, I did not Didn’t expect to like it that much but I really like it, so that’s the area I aspire to go into,” she said. As the fourth-year medical student looks forward to the next steps in her career, she reflects on her time at Wake Forest and how far she’s come to get to where she is today. “Seven years is a long time. So a lot of life happens in 7 years. I had some of the best times of my life, like I got married in the first week of school in medicine I had my first child, like the fifth year out of seven. I have another one on the way. But at the same time, in my first year, my father passed away. So it was something really difficult to manage and on the way to becoming parents, we had a lot of problems and had repeated miscarriages and ended up having to do IVF, ”she said With the day of the game here, West- Livingston said the feeling was “surreal. “I try to think I’m not going to cry. But, I’m pretty sure I’m gonna cry when I open my envelope. Wherever I go, I’ll be really, really excited,” she said. She is also happy to pass on what she has learned along the way. “To teach our children that it is important that before you are a student, before you are employed, you are a person. So you have to focus on your life and your family. But, at the same time, when you go to work and feel like you can make a difference, it’s something to aspire to and can be really powerful. Game day is back in person at Wake Forest School of Medicine for the first time in a few years due to COVID-19 restrictions. Matching students will begin their residencies or internships on July 1.

It’s “game day” at medical schools across the country.

An exciting and challenging stage for fourth-year medical students.

They will know where they complete their residencies after graduation when the envelopes are opened at noon.

Wake Forest School of Medicine student Lauren West-Livingston said she was excited to know where she will be paired up.

He is a person who defines resilience, focus and determination and through the ups and downs of life and has let nothing stop him from achieving his dreams.

West-Livingston is a daughter, wife, mother and friend. She has two master’s degrees, a doctorate, and is about to add a medical degree to her long and growing list of credentials.

“Something that was instilled in me when I was younger was that any opportunity you have to get an education, to have a job or to have a career, there are certain privileges that I I will have that other people won’t have and if I can use my education and my job opportunities to better the lives of others, that’s really what matters at the end of the day,” West-Livingston said.

That’s why she’s drawn to vascular surgery, which helps treat conditions affecting certain parts of the body like veins and arteries. She found her passion in this specialty at Wake Forest School of Medicine.

“I’ve had the opportunity to work with marginalized patients who may not have seen a doctor for many, many years, before showing up to vascular surgeons with a big problem. So I think this was my second year overall I was kind of like okay I didn’t expect to like it so much but I really like it so that’s the area in which I aspire to go,” she said.

As the fourth-year medical student looks forward to the next steps in her career, she reflects on her time at Wake Forest and how far she’s come to get to where she is today.

“Seven years is a long time. So a lot of life happens in 7 years. I had some of the best times of my life, like I got married in the first week of school in medicine I had my first child, like the fifth year out of seven. I have another one on the way. But at the same time, in my first year, my father passed away. So it was something really difficult to manage and on the way to becoming parents, we had a lot of problems and had repeated miscarriages and ended up having to do IVF,” she said.

With game day here, West-Livingston said the feeling was “surreal”.

“I try to think I’m not going to cry. But, I’m pretty sure I’m going to cry when I open my envelope. Wherever I go, I’ll be really, really excited,” she said .

She is also happy to pass on what she has learned along the way.

“To teach our children that it is important that before you are a student, before you are employed, you are a person. So you have to focus on your life and your family. But, at the same time, when you go to work and feel like you can make a difference, it’s something to aspire to and can be really powerful.

Game day is back in person at Wake Forest School of Medicine for the first time in a few years due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Matching students will begin their residencies or internships on July 1.